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Florida Department of State Adds Three New Golf Courses to the Florida Historic Golf Trail

Tallahassee –

Secretary of State Ken Detzner announced today that three additional golf courses have joined the Florida Historic Golf Trail. The new partner courses include Delray Beach Golf Club, Lake Wales Country Club, and the Capital City Country Club in Tallahassee. Fifty three of Florida’s historic golf courses are now on the Florida Historic Golf Trail.

 “We are pleased to announce the addition of three historic golf courses on the Florida Historic Golf Trail,” said Secretary Detzner. “Each of these courses were developed early in the 20th century and showcase Florida’s rich golfing tradition. Every course along the Trail offers today’s golfer the opportunity to ‘Come Play on History!’

The Delray Beach Golf Club is located in the city of Delray Beach in Palm Beach County. In 1923, the city purchased land for a municipal golf course, and two years later legendary golf course architect Donald Ross designed an 18-hole golf course for the property.  In 1926, the golf course officially opened but only nine holes were built. The 9-hole course continued in operation until it was closed because of World War II. After reopening in 1945, the City leaders voted to add a second nine holes which opened in 1950. Today, the Delray Beach Golf Club includes an 18-hole, par-72 golf course featuring four sets of tees playing from 5,100 to 6,800 yards. 

The Lake Wales Country Club is located in the city of Lake Wales in Polk County. In 1924, the City of Lake Wales approved a special $190,000 bond which included $55,000 for the construction of a municipal golf course. The city acquired the services of one of America’s most renowned golf course architects, Seth Raynor, who had designed the nearby Mountain Lake golf course. On January 27, 1925, Lake Wales Mayor L.H. Kramer declared a holiday for the formal opening of the golf course. Only nine holes were opened for play that year, but the other nine holes that had been laid out by Raynor were constructed and completed a year later. The Lake Wales Country Club now includes an 18-hole, par-71/72 golf course featuring seven sets of tees playing from 4,200 to 7,000 yards.

The Capital City Country Club is located in the city of Tallahassee in Leon County. In 1913, George B. Perkins secured the services of professional golf expert, Herbert H. Barker to lay out new golf links. The 9-hole golf course was completed in 1914 and remained a 9-hole golf course for nearly two decades. In 1935, the City of Tallahassee applied for and received a federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) grant for the expansion of the golf course to 18 holes. Albert W. Tillinghast, one of America’s most renowned golf course architects, reviewed and commented on plans for both the nine new holes and the existing nine holes. Construction began in early 1936 and was completed within a few years. Today, the Capital City Country Club includes an 18-hole, par-72 golf course featuring four sets of tees playing from 5,200 to 6,500 yards. 

For more information visit the Florida Historic Golf Trail  website or on Facebook.

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About The Florida Historic Golf Trail

Florida's golf history, recognized as one of the oldest in the nation, dates back to the 1890s when a number of early courses were created along with the development of railroads and hotels in the state. The Florida Historic Golf Trail is a collection of more than 50 historic, publicly accessible golf courses throughout the state that can still be played on today.Through the Florida Historic Golf Trail, golfers can play on courses designed by world-class architects and played by famous golfers such as Bobby Jones, Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen, Babe Zaharias, Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus.  Information about the history and current day contact information for each partner course can be found at FloridaHistoricGolfTrail.com.  Find the historic course near you and Come Play on History!

About The Division of Historical Resources

The Florida Department of State’s Division of Historical Resources (DHR) is responsible for preserving and promoting Florida’s historical, archaeological, and folk culture resources. DHR directs historic preservation efforts throughout the state in cooperation with state and federal agencies, local governments, private organizations, and individuals. The director of DHR serves as the State Historic Preservation Officer, acting as the liaison with the national historic preservation program conducted by the National Park Service. The Division is comprised of two Bureaus or major program areas: archaeological research and historic preservation. For more information, visit flheritage.com.