Historic Rehabilitation

In 2009, the Florida Department of State’s Division of Historical Resources began rehabilitating The Grove to serve as a public museum of history to benefit Florida residents and visitors.

Rehabilitation efforts at The Grove continue the stewardship and legacy of historic preservation established by the Collins family, who, for more than a half-century, dedicated their lives to preserving the home and its grounds.

Work by the State of Florida on the project has followed federal standards for historic preservation established by the Secretary of the Interior, with the ultimate goal of achieving LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. Once completed, The Grove will become one of only a handful of historic properties in the nation to earn LEED certification from U.S. Green Building Council.

The photographs below provide a sample of rehabilitation efforts at The Grove, including the restoration of the historic cistern, the adaptive re-use of an existing structure, and interior and exterior repair to historic masonry.

The photograph on the left shows a worker inside the historic cistern during restoration. The photograph on the right shows dog tags recovered from the cistern.

Archaeologists recovered several artifacts from the historic cistern during its restoration (left), including dog tags belonging to Lieutenant Joseph G. Azat (right). Gutters and downspouts from the house empty into the restored cistern, which now provides water for irrigation at The Grove. Photographs by Roy Lett, Division of Historical Resources 

The photograph on the right shows a carport build by the Collins family on the east side of their home. The photograph on the right shows the carport after it was converted to a bathroom pavilion.

The carport built by the Collins family on the east side of the house was converted into a bathroom pavilion. Repurposing the carport is an example of the adaptive re-use of an existing structure at The Grove. Left photograph by Roy Lett, Division of Historical Resources, right photography by Johnathan H. Grandage, Division of Historical Resources 

The photograph on the left shows interior walls during rehabilitation. The photograph on the right shows the same walls after rehabilitation was complete. 

Historic masonry repair experts completed substantial work inside the home. The photograph on the left shows one of the formal entertaining spaces on the first floor, the former dining room, during rehabilitation. The photograph on the right shows the same room after rehabilitation. Note the arched pediments in the right photograph, indicative of the formal nature of the space. Left photograph by Roy Lett, Division of Historical Resources, right photograph by Gary Pettit, Division of Cultural Affairs 

The photograph on the left shows the Call/Collins House during exterior masonry repair. The photograph on the right shows the same angle after work was completed.

Structural work at The Grove included exterior masonry and stucco repair. The photograph on the left shows scaffolding erected during exterior rehabilitation. The photograph on the right shows the finished product. Photographs by Roy Lett, Division of Historical Resources 

The photograph on the left shows archaeologist Claire Tindal and Collins family member LeRoy Collins III repairing a tombstone in the family cemetery. The photograph on the right shows their initial work to repair the damaged tombstone.

Damage to one of the headstones in the family cemetery required repair and restoration. The photograph on the left shows archaeologist Claire Tindal and Collins family member LeRoy Collins III piecing back together the damaged headstone. The photograph on the right shows the headstone after initial repair work. Photographs by Marie Prentice, Division of Historical Resources