Cultural Resource Protection

Introduction

Florida is home to a rich variety of cultural resources. They include 12,000 year old Native American sites, the remains of early European settlements, and more recently, Mediterranean Revival homes and Art Deco buildings. Although many significant cultural resources are in public ownership, private landholders own significantly more, and thus, are able to preserve these tangible remains of Florida's past for the future. The tradition of stewardship for private property is well developed in our society, especially among owners of large tracts. Landowners have little difficulty extending their customary care of natural resources to cultural resources, once they understand where the resources are and how they can be protected. The goal of this website is to provide private landowners with information about how they can protect cultural resources in their ownership.

What are "Cultural Resources"?

"Cultural Resources" are those resources that represent a culture or society, either past or present, and may include landscapes, structures, and/or archaeological sites. Typically, cultural resources that are protected are those from past cultures, such as colonial European and Native American, because these cultures are irreplacable.

Why Protect Cultural Resources in my Ownership?

Protecting cultural resources in your ownership has several advantages. To begin with, tax benefits are possible through certain methods of resource protection. Secondly, cultural resource protection on private lands may better your community's educational and recreational benefits, and finally, preservation and protection of the past provides a legacy for future generations.

Best Management Practices

Taking care of archaeological sites on private lands is much like caring for other resources. The basic principles and techniques have been organized into a series of best management practices. You can download the Florida Best Management Practices Handbook (pdf, 2.48 mb) (download Adobe Acrobat).